History & Research

 

 

Online Ticket and Advance Reservations

Beginning August 15 at 6pm, visitors will be able to secure their admissions and reserve a tour time in advance, online.  We will be offering 2 admissions types:  Historic Site with the “Big House” Exhibit and Historic Site without the “Big House” Exhibit
 
If you are planning a visit to Oak Alley on August 16 or later, please check back to make you reservation or for more information on admissions pricing and details, please click HERE.  While we highly encourage purchasing your admission online in advance, walk-ins are welcome and are subject to availability. 
 
We look forward to your visit and please contact us at 800-442-5539 or at ContactUs@OakAlleyPlantation.org if you have any questions. 
 
 
White Washed Slave Cabins

A sugar plantation; an abandoned investment property; a cattle ranch; a landscape of defiance in the face of the Army Corps of Engineers--Oak Alley has been many things in its over 200 years of history. Today it is a historic site, dedicated to preserving and interpreting each chapter of this plantation’s memory. Our mission, established by Mrs. Josephine Stewart is as follows:

Oak Alley Foundation is a 501(c)(3) public non-profit trust organized and operated exclusively for charitable, literary and educational purposes. Its trustees are charged with maintaining and preserving the mansion (Big House) and surrounding sixty-three (63) acre National Historic Landmark site for public exhibition as an historical monument to the times and area in which the property was built and for the instruction, education, enlightenment, information, edification and cultural benefit of the citizens of the State of Louisiana, the United States and the public generally.

Open to the public since 1976, our institutional values include complete respect for the National Landmark with which we have been entrusted. This not only is evident in our dedication to it’s preservation and maintenance but in our complete adherence to narrative integrity, in deference to this iconic historic site whose past includes serving as a place of enslavement even as it was celebrated for it’s stunning landscape.